Lundbeck puts depression on the global mental health agenda

On November 25, 2014, Lundbeck is sponsoring a one-day forum along with The Economist Events to examine the burden of depression as well as a variety of national responses to it, bringing in cross-sector stakeholders who are trying to tackle a problem that has become a leading cause of illness.

Despite the scale of the serious health and economic implications, depression is often seen as less deserving of public health resources than physical illness, and the responses to it remain inadequate.1  

The complexity of the problem requires a multi-faceted approach, with engagement from government, academia, healthcare providers, the pharmaceutical industry, employers and patient groups. Lundbeck has entered into a partnership with The Economist Events, who will convene and host a global Conference on Depression on November 25, 2014. The Economist is a preeminent global brand for world opinion leaders seeking information and clarity for many of the worlds’ complex issues and events, representing an excellent collaboration partner for Lundbeck to address the global burden of depression.

Contributing to the public health debate
Lundbeck, with its unique position as a specialist in neuroscience research, remains strongly committed to finding new and improved treatments to improve the lives of people suffering from brain disease.   Lundbeck has a significant role to play in helping to foster and contribute to the public health debate. By sponsoring this conference, Lundbeck expect world opinion leaders to make significant step forward in acknowledging the importance of increasing the level of resources in order to reflect the increasing burden of depression to society at large.

Why does over a quarter of working age citizens suffer from depression?2
Mental disorders are a huge and growing challenge to societies. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), depression alone accounted for the greatest burden of disease in middle and high income countries in 2004, and this is expected to apply worldwide by 2030.3

Depression is a serious and sometimes life-threatening condition which affects people’s ability to work, study and perform other daily routines, thereby imposing enormous costs not only on healthcare systems, but also on society in general. For example, depression is the predominant mental health problem among working-age patients,4 costing US employers $44bn (2003 estimate) a year in lost productivity time.5

While less pronounced than in the past, there continues to be great stigma associated with depression, reflecting the absence of clear physical symptoms, which prevents it from being accorded the same status as diseases like cancer and diabetes.

References

  1. http://www.who.int/mental_health/management/depression/definition/en/index.html
  2. European Pact for Mental Health and Well-being, 2008 
  3. http://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/en/
  4. European Pact for Mental Health and Well-being, 2008
  5. Stewart WF, Ricci JA, Chee E, Hahn S, Morganstein D. JAMA 2003, 289 (23) : 3135-3144

More information

The event in detail

Lundbeck is sponsoring a one-day forum to examine the burden of depression as well as a variety of national responses to it, bringing in cross-sector stakeholders who are trying to tackle a problem that has become a leading cause of illness. The event will take a multi-faceted approach, gathering together policymakers, healthcare providers, the pharmaceutical industry, academia, employers and patient groups.

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